Environment

Time to Act: March with us against fracking

Friends of the Earth - March 04, 2015
We’re growing in waves. More and more people are realising that the F word is a dirty word. Cameron and Osborne are trying their best to ignore us. They removed a ban on fracking near drinking water sources, hoping we wouldn’t notice. The Labour Party opposed the Government's u-turn. But only 6 Conservative and 3 Lib Dem MPs voted against it. The result? Vital protection for water was lost.  Cameron’s government also changed the trespass law. Fracking companies can now drill under our homes without permission. All this shows that Government is becoming
Categories: Environment

Climate Change Poses Serious Threats to Food Distribution

The EnvironmentaList - March 04, 2015
The risks of a highly centralized food system
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Join the climate movement – dates for your diary

Friends of the Earth - March 03, 2015
But vast numbers of people around the world are already working hard to tackle this injustice. The mercury is rising fast - but the movement to cool the planet is rising up faster. And as the Friends of the Earth network of local groups and activists, we’re all part of it. There are going to be many opportunities this year to join with others, connect the dots, and show that we have the solutions - and that world leaders need to catch up. Key dates for your diary 28 March: 'This Changes Everything' conference, London, with Naomi Klein Join this event at Friends Meeting House
Categories: Environment

Photographs of Amazon Forest Added to Google Street View Collection

Yale Environment 360 - March 03, 2015
Detailed views of the Amazon rainforest, its rivers, and indigenous communities are the latest additions to Google's

Enlarge

Boaters on the Rio Negro "Street View" collection, the company announced this week. The imagery — captured while boating down 500 kilometers of rivers, walking along 20 kilometers of trails, and ziplining through dense forest — reveals stunning views of the Amazon from the top of its canopy to the forest floor. The photos also capture daily life in 17 communities of local people who live deep within the rainforest and along the Rio Mariepauá, one of the Amazon River's largest tributaries. The images were collected in partnership with the conservation organization Amazonas Sustainable Foundation, which hopes that sharing in-depth photographs of the area will help promote conservation efforts.
Categories: Environment, Health

How Climate Change Helped Lead to the Uprising in Syria

Yale Environment 360 - March 03, 2015
A new study draws links between a record drought in Syria and the uprising that erupted there in 2011. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, Colin Kelley, the study’s lead author, discusses how the severity of that drought was connected to a long-term warming trend in the region. BY DIANE TOOMEY
Categories: Environment, Health

A Journey to “The Place Where Life Begins”

The EnvironmentaList - March 03, 2015
A photo essay from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Emperor Penguins Had FewRefuges During Last Ice Age, Study Finds

Yale Environment 360 - March 02, 2015
The Ross Sea and certain other Antarctic waters likely served as refuges for the three emperor penguin populations that

Emperor penguins survived during the last ice age, when large amounts of ice made much of the rest of Antarctica uninhabitable, according to a new study published in the journal Global Change Biology. The findings suggest that extreme climatic conditions on the continent during the past 30,000 years created an evolutionary "bottleneck" that is evident in the genetic material of modern-day emperor penguins, a species known for its ability to thrive in icy habitats. But during the last ice age, the Antarctic likely had twice as much sea ice, the researchers say, leaving only a few locations for the penguins to breed — distances from the open ocean (where the penguins feed) to the stable sea ice (where they breed) were too great. The three populations that did manage to survive may have done so by breeding near areas of ocean that are kept free of sea ice by wind and currents, the researchers suggest.
Categories: Environment, Health

Along Cuba’s Coast, The Last Best Coral Reefs in the Caribbean Thrive

Yale Environment 360 - March 02, 2015
Decades of communist rule and a U.S. embargo have stifled coastal development in Cuba, which has had the beneficial effect of leaving many of the country’s coral reefs intact. In this gallery, photographer Robert Wintner documents the exquisite beauty and biodiversity of Cuba’s coral reef ecosystems.
Categories: Environment, Health

Nature in the City

The EnvironmentaList - March 02, 2015
In Chicagoland, a quiet rewilding is underway
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Spotlight on a Cadette for National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend

Girl Scouts of America - March 01, 2015
National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend is a time for cookie lovers everywhere to learn more about the good the Girl Scouts do for their local community.  This year, we’re happy to share just a few of those exceptional stories with you.
Having been in Girl Scouts for four years, Sidney could tell you a thing or two about selling cookies.  So when she noticed that people avoided purchasing cookies, she found a new way to keep them interested and engaged.  For every sale that Sidney made, she’d ask, “Would you like to donate a box to the military?”  And, unsurprisingly, people kept saying yes.  She took those 296 boxes of donated cookies and sent them directly to the USS Theodore Roosevelt operations department, after meeting a former sailor at a cookie booth.
But Sidney didn’t stop there.  Even after they donated those extra boxes to the military, she and her troop were able to donate over $750 worth of much needed items to a local humane society, and a total of 320 volunteer hours.
So, when you head out to a cookie booth in your community this weekend, be sure to ask the girls what they do with their cookie money.  Because, oh, what a girl can do!
Categories: Environment

Happy National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend!

Girl Scouts of America - February 27, 2015

Yes! It’s here. National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend—the perfect time to celebrate all the amazing things girls do with their cookie earnings every year, for their communities and beyond. On top of teaching five super-important life skills—including goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics—the Girl Scout Cookie Program gives girls the opportunity to build their confidence, make friends, become rock-star social entrepreneurs, and have a ton of fun along the way.
This weekend, celebrate cookie bosses everywhere by visiting your local Girl Scout Cookie booth and showing your support. But don’t stop at the cookies! During your visit, ask girls about their cookie sale. What are their goals this year? What are they planning to do with their cookie earnings, and what is their favorite thing about the program? They are doing so much awesome stuff, and they’ll love to share their stories.

Join the fun. Get in the cookie spirit!


Categories: Environment

#GimmieFive and Let's Move!

Girl Scouts of America - February 27, 2015
In February 2010, First Lady Michelle Obama launched Let’s Move!, an initiative that encouraged kids all over the country to get out, get active, and create a healthier future for themselves and their families. To celebrate the fifth anniversary of Let’s Move! this month, the White House has kicked things up a notch with the #GimmieFive challenge.
To join in the fun, just share five ways you’re leading a healthier life and challenge your friends and family to do the same by posting photos or videos with #GimmeFive on Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Facebook, or Tumblr. Looking for inspiration? Here are five ways you might get active—outdoors!—as a Girl Scout.
  • Do a “detective hike” and investigate leaves or tracks along the trail as part of the Brownie Hiker badge.
  • Play a nighttime game of flashlight tag while earning the Junior Camper badge.
  • Take part in a wacky relay race as part of the Cadette Field Day badge.
  • Explore a farm or orchard along the Senior Sow What? Journey.
  • Go snorkeling, surfing, or tubing as part of the Ambassador Water badge.
Of course there are plenty of opportunities for our littlest Girl Scouts, too! Daisies might create their own “pedal power” by riding bikes on the Between Earth and Sky Journey, or play Red Light, Green Light outdoors while earning their Lupe petal.
Questions about the #GimmieFive challenge? Learn more at LetsMove.gov.
Categories: Environment

Spotlight on a Brownie for National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend

Girl Scouts of America - February 27, 2015
National Girl Scout Cookie Weekend is a time for cookie lovers everywhere to learn more about the good the Girl Scouts do for their local community.  This year, we’re happy to share just a few of those exceptional stories with you.
Through the cookie program, our Girl Scouts are given an incredible opportunity to make a difference in lives of others and in their surrounding community.  A fabulous example is Emily, a 7-year old Brownie on a mission to honor her late father.
Emily’s father, Ethan, had previously battled cancer in his teenage years, but was in remission when he met Emily’s mother, Suzanne, in 2006.  After his cancer had tragically spread throughout his body, he passed away in 2009 at age 24, just one year after Emily was born.  While fighting cancer, he was treated at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, and that’s where Emily decided to pay it forward.
Through the Gift of Caring option at Girl Scouts of Western Pennsylvania, Emily is able to give cookie customers the option to donate cookies to the children’s hospital.  Last season, Emily easily surpassed her original donation goal of 1,000 boxes, and worked with her troop to donate a whopping 4,000 boxes to the children.  “Her family told me they’d love nothing more than to see every children’s hospital across the country receive a cookie donation like this,” said Nancy Irwin, communications director for Western Pennsylvania.
Though Emily did not have much of a chance to know her father, it seems that she embodies a lot of qualities he possessed.  When asked by a local paper why Emily wanted to do this, her mother had a simple answer. “She’s just a very good-hearted kid who wants to do good,” Suzanne said.  “She’s him.”
So, when you head out to a cookie booth in your community this weekend, be sure to ask the girls what they do with their cookie money.  Because, oh, what a girl can do!
Categories: Environment

Growing Risks to India's Water Supply Mapped With New Online Tool

Yale Environment 360 - February 27, 2015
A new online tool could help water users in India understand the risks to their water supply, which is dwindling and increasingly

Enlarge

Groundwater levels polluted, recent analyses show. The tool, created by 13 organizations including the World Resources Institute, allows users to see where the competition for surface water is most intense, where groundwater levels are dropping significantly, and where pollution levels exceed safety standards. Northwest India, for example, faces extremely high surface water stress as well as low groundwater levels, as this map shows. Overall, 54 percent of India is under high or extremely high water stress, an equal portion is seeing declining groundwater levels, and more 130 million people live where at least one pollutant exceeds national safety standards, according to the World Resources Institute.
Categories: Environment, Health

China Imposes One-Year Ban on Ivory Imports Following Mounting Criticism

The EnvironmentaList - February 26, 2015
Wildlife advocates hopeful, but say more needs to be done to save African elephants from being poached to extinction
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Girl Scouts Honors Condoleezza Rice During Black History Month

Girl Scouts of America - February 26, 2015
 (Photo credit: Oprah.com)
Did you know that every female secretary of state in U.S. history is a former Girl Scout? This is just further proof of the power of the Girl Scout mission—to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place—as so many Girl Scout alumnae go on to achieve great things in the world, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. Today, we honor Condoleezza Rice, a fearless leader who started her leadership journey in Girl Scouting.
Condoleezza Rice was the second African American secretary of state and the first female African-American secretary of state, setting an amazing example for young girls of color who saw so few people like them in the world of government and politics. Like many women of color, Rice was met with doubt and discrimination despite her impressive resume and the wealth of knowledge she brought to the table, but she refused to be reduced by the obstacles she faced. She persevered, and ultimately landed the position of national security advisor to President George W. Bush during his first term, the first woman to serve in that position.

Today, we’re proud to honor Condoleezza Rice. Because of leaders like her, girls can dream bigger than they ever imagined and envision themselves as movers, shakers, and policy makers. 
Categories: Environment

For First Time in Nature Scientists Measure Heat-Trapping Effects of CO2

Yale Environment 360 - February 26, 2015
Scientists have long understood how carbon dioxide traps heat in the atmosphere and contributes to global warming, but the phenomenon had not been directly documented at the earth's surface outside of a laboratory — until now. Writing in the journal Nature, researchers present 11 years of field data on carbon dioxide's capacity to absorb thermal radiation emitted from the surface of the earth. The results agree with theoretical predictions of the greenhouse effect associated with fossil fuel combustion, researchers say, and provide further confirmation that calculations used in climate models are on track when it comes to representing the impact of CO2 emissions. "We see, for the first time in the field, the amplification of the greenhouse effect because there's more CO2 in the atmosphere to absorb what the earth emits in response to incoming solar radiation," says Daniel Feldman, a scientist at Berkeley Lab and lead author of the study.
Categories: Environment, Health

Heard about the FBI Tracking of Keystone XL Activists? It’s Worse than You Thought.

The EnvironmentaList - February 26, 2015
The energy industry is now firmly hitched to the national security state.
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

In Kenya’s Mountain Forests, A New Path to Conservation

Yale Environment 360 - February 26, 2015
Kenya’s high-elevation forests are the source for most of the water on which the drought-plagued nation depends. Now, after decades of government-abetted abuse of these regions, a new conservation strategy of working with local communities is showing signs of success. BY FRED PEARCE
Categories: Environment, Health

El Golfo de California: Un Mundo de Encuentros

Costa Salvaje - February 26, 2015
El Golfo de California: Un Mundo de Encuentros
Categories: Environment
Syndicate content