Environment

Citizen Scientists: Using the How Citizen Scientists Are Using the Web to Track the Natural WorldWeb To Keep Track of the Environment

Yale Environment 360 - June 23, 2014


By making the recording and sharing of environmental data easier than ever, web-based technology has fostered the rapid growth of so-called citizen scientists — volunteers who collaborate with scientists to collect and interpret data. Numerous Internet-based projects now make use of citizen scientists to monitor environmental health and to track sensitive plant and wildlife populations. From counting butterflies, frogs, and bats across the globe, to piloting personal drones capable of high-definition infrared imaging, citizen scientists are playing a crucial role in collecting data that will help researchers understand the environment. Here is a sampling of some of these projects.
View the gallery.
Categories: Environment, Health

Citizen Scientists: Using the Web To Keep Track of the Environment

Yale Environment 360 - June 23, 2014


By making the recording and sharing of environmental data easier than ever, web-based technology has fostered the rapid growth of so-called citizen scientists — volunteers who collaborate with scientists to collect and interpret data. Numerous Internet-based projects now make use of citizen scientists to monitor environmental health and to track sensitive plant and wildlife populations. From counting butterflies, frogs, and bats across the globe, to piloting personal drones capable of high-definition infrared imaging, citizen scientists are playing a crucial role in collecting data that will help researchers understand the environment. Here is a sampling of some of these projects.
View the gallery.
Categories: Environment, Health

¡Tenemos nueva Reserva Mundial de Surf en Baja California!

Costa Salvaje - June 23, 2014
¡Tenemos nueva Reserva Mundial de Surf en Baja California!
Categories: Environment

Texting & Driving: IT CAN WAIT!

Girl Scouts of America - June 21, 2014
Girl Scouts nationwide are more excited than ever to head to camp this summer.
Whether you or your Girl Scout are heading outdoors to kayak, flexing your leadership muscle at Camp CEO, or finding your passion for science and engineering at STEM camp, one thing is certain: WE HAVE TO GET TO CAMP SOMEHOW!
On the road to camp, remember -- between good times with the car windows down and sing-a-longs with friends at the top of our lungs -- #itcanwait. 
If you are of age to drive, or if an adult is driving, remember that texting and driving is dangerous and deadly. 
●over 100,000 accidents per year are caused by texting and driving●texting makes a car accident up to 23 times more likely●75% of teens say texting and driving is "common"
What can you do?
●If you're driving a car, concentrate on the road. Put your phone away before you start the car, and if you're phone rings or dings, remember-- #itcanwait! 
●If you're a passenger in a car, you can set a positive example by putting away your phone, too! Be supportive of the driver and remind them #itcanwait! 
●Are you one of the 4.7 MILLION people who took the It Can Wait Pledge? NO!? Then head to ItCanWait.com and take the pledge! Remember to share your pledge on Twitter and Facebook to encourage friends to do the same!
Categories: Environment

BLOG: Celebrating ’5th Birthday and Beyond’

Operation USA - June 20, 2014

Operation USA is proud to be a coalition partner in the ’5th Birthday and Beyond’ campaign. Read on to learn why we’re helping to celebrate more 5th birthdays around the world, and what you can do to get involved!

For many families, a child’s fifth birthday is just one of many milestones to be celebrated in his/her young life. But, did you know that there is a staggering number of children around the world who never make it to the age of five? Millions of children’s lives are cut short each year due to poverty, hunger and disease. Despite major progress in global health (thanks in large part to the United States!) there are still 6.6 million children who will die this year, mainly from preventable diseases. Fortunately, there are steps each of us can take to help reduce the number of child deaths each year and continue to help more children worldwide not only to survive, but also to thrive, after the age of five.


Richard Walden, CEO of Operation USA, at five years old

Over the past two decades, the United States has played a leading role in preventing the deaths of millions of children under the age of five. This year, six million fewer children will die before their fifth birthday than just 25 years ago. U.S. foreign assistance has played a leading role in achieving these results, dramatically improving children’s health and survival worldwide. In just 12 short years, deaths from diseases such as pneumonia, malaria, diarrhea, measles and AIDS have dropped significantly, according to data compiled by UNICEF.

The United States has also played a leading role in the reduction of sicknesses around the world. Today, 10 million people are walking, spared the crippling effects of polio thanks to the global polio eradication program led by the U.S. government, UNICEF, WHO, Rotary International and the Gates Foundation.*

With the support of the American people, U.S. foreign assistance programs have helped cut in half the annual number of deaths of children under five since 1990. These results are due in large part to the historic collaboration between the world’s governments, multilateral institutions and local players. In addition, diverse allies such as NGOs (like Operation USA), civic groups, faith and business communities, universities and philanthropies have come together to leverage billions more private dollars for overseas health and development programs.

While much progress has been made over the past 25 years, we still have far to go. An estimated 6.6 million children won’t reach their fifth birthday this year. That’s 18,000 children a day who still don’t reach that milestone. Forty-four percent of those deaths occur during the newborn period, and many are due to preventable diseases. Now is the time to re-commit our investments in life-saving programs, providing millions of children the opportunity to survive and thrive beyond their fifth birthday!

Five easy ways to get involved:
1) Visit 5thbdayandbeyond.org to get the facts, upload your fifth birthday photo and join the movement.
2) Make a donation in support of effective interventions such as bed nets, immunizations, anti-retroviral medications, clean water and toilets, better nutrition and quality care at birth.
3) Help us share this message on Facebook and help more children reach age five.
4) Show your support by sharing your commitment with the #5thbday tag on Twitter.
5) Research ’5th Birthday and Beyond’ causes in your local community for opportunities to volunteer your time or get involved in hands-on projects.

To learn more about Operation USA’s commitment to programs supporting children around the world, click here.

*http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs114/en/

Categories: Environment

Average Summer Temperatures in U.S. Have Risen Up To 5 Degrees Since 1970

Yale Environment 360 - June 20, 2014
Summer temperatures in the U.S. have been rising on average 0.4 degrees F per decade since 1970, or about

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Average summertime temperature increases 2 degrees F overall, but the Southwest and West regions have borne the brunt of those increases, according to an analysis by Climate Central. In the Southwest, temperatures have risen an average of 0.6 degrees per decade, with a few localized areas warming as much as 0.9 degrees per decade. In the West, some parts of California and Nevada have warmed 1.32 degrees F per decade, or more than 5 degrees total since 1970. On the other end of the spectrum, the Upper Midwest has seen the lowest increases. Temperatures in that region have increased only 0.1 degree F per decade on average. The National Climate Assessment, released last month, found that annual average temperatures in the U.S. could increase by 10 degrees F before the end of the century if the rate of greenhouse gas emissions doesn't slow.
Categories: Environment, Health

Louisiana Levee Authority’s Suit Against Oil & Gas Companies Survives Move to Kill It

The EnvironmentaList - June 20, 2014
Governor Bobby Jindal’s effort to quash the environmental damages claim might backfire
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Rerouting Flights to Avoid Contrails Would Slow Climate Change

Yale Environment 360 - June 19, 2014
Rerouting the flight paths of commercial aircraft to minimize the condensation trails, or contrails, they leave behind would help slow global warming, even if

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Alternate flight paths to avoid contrail formation the new flight path is longer, according to research published today. Contrails, thin clouds composed of ice crystals condensed from an aircraft's exhaust, can persist for 17 hours or more and are likely the single largest contributor to climate change associated with aviation. They form when a plane passes through parts of the atmosphere that are very cold and moist, usually near high pressure systems. The new research shows that avoiding contrail formation has greater climate benefits than avoiding additional carbon dioxide emissions associated with slightly longer flight routes. For example, for a small aircraft that is predicted to form a contrail 20 miles long, an alternative path that adds less than 200 miles will have a smaller climate impact than the contrail. For a larger aircraft, which emits more CO2 per mile than a smaller plane, the alternative route is preferable if it adds less than 60 miles, according to researchers from the University of Reading.
Categories: Environment, Health

Peak Coal: Why the Industry’s Dominance May Soon Be Over

Yale Environment 360 - June 19, 2014
The coal industry has achieved stunning growth in the last decade, largely due to increased demand in China. But big changes in China’s economy and its policies are expected to put an end to coal’s big boom. BY FRED PEARCE
Categories: Environment, Health

National Aquarium Considering Ending Its Captive Dolphin Exhibit

The EnvironmentaList - June 19, 2014
Move could be an industry game-changer
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Global Energy Sector Must Prepare for Climate Change, Report Says

Yale Environment 360 - June 18, 2014
Power plants and energy systems around the world will experience potentially disastrous effects from climate change and should develop plans for dealing with those effects, according to a report released today by the World Energy Council and European researchers. Long-term droughts, for example, could threaten water supplies needed to cool large power plants as they produce electricity, the report notes. Many energy facilities are also lacking protection from floods, rising seas, and severe weather events — a problem highlighted by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Strong global political action could have major impacts on the energy sector, the report says, especially if governments make a coordinated effort to invest in renewable and low-carbon energy and upgrades to power distribution grids.
Categories: Environment, Health

Global Energy Sector Must Prepare for Climate Change, Report Says

Yale Environment 360 - June 18, 2014
Power plants and energy systems around the world will experience potentially disastrous effects from climate change and should develop plans for dealing with those effects, according to a report released today by the World Energy Council and European researchers. Long-term droughts, for example, could threaten water supplies needed to cool large power plants as they produce electricity, the report notes. Many energy facilities are also lacking protection from floods, rising seas, and severe weather events — a problem highlighted by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Strong global political action could have major impacts on the energy sector, the report says, especially if governments make a coordinated effort to invest in renewable and low-carbon energy and upgrades to power distribution grids. Making energy systems resilient to climate change in the coming decade will require hundreds of billions of dollars from governments and industries around the globe, but most of that money is already slated to be spent keeping the current systems running, the report says.
Categories: Environment, Health

Feeding Hawai‘i

The EnvironmentaList - June 18, 2014
Could small, biodiverse farms help the Aloha State transition to growing enough food to feed itself?
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Global Livestock Maps Highlight Regions Prone to Disease and Pollution

Yale Environment 360 - June 17, 2014
A new mapping tool shows the global distribution of cattle, pigs, and other livestock in high-resolution, 1-square-kilometer detail. Created by the International

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Density of pigs in China. Livestock Research Institute, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and British and Belgian researchers, the maps are the most detailed renditions ever produced of the planet's billions of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, and ducks. They reveal several notable trends, such as the high density of pigs in China, India's relatively high sheep and goat populations, and the affinity of the southeastern U.S. for chickens. Researchers say they will be powerful tools for tracking and predicting livestock-borne disease outbreaks, such as avian flu strains that have been linked to dense poultry markets. The maps could also predict where major livestock operations are most likely to harm the environment, researchers say. As livestock production increases, demands on land, water, and energy intensify, and so does pollution from livestock waste.
Categories: Environment, Health

Global Livestock Maps Highlight Regions Prone to Disease and Pollution

Yale Environment 360 - June 17, 2014
A new mapping tool shows the global distribution of cattle, pigs, and other livestock in high-resolution, 1-square-kilometer detail. Created by the International

Click to Enlarge

Density of pigs in China. Livestock Research Institute, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and British and Belgian researchers, the maps are the most detailed renditions ever produced of the planet's billions of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, and ducks. They reveal several notable trends, such as the high density of pigs in China, India's relatively high sheep and goat populations, and the affinity of the southeastern U.S. for chickens. Researchers say they will be powerful tools for tracking and predicting livestock-borne disease outbreaks, such as avian flu strains that have been linked to dense poultry markets. The maps could also predict where major livestock operations are most likely to harm the environment, researchers say. As livestock production increases, demands on land, water, and energy intensify, and so does pollution from livestock waste.
Categories: Environment, Health

Green Group Warns Keystone XL May be Vulnerable to Terrorist Attack. But Will the Warning Backfire?

The EnvironmentaList - June 17, 2014
NextGen report could lead to a blowback against peaceful protesters
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

The Contamination of Natural Kaua`i

The EnvironmentaList - June 17, 2014
The Garden Island’s rare plants and wildlife are being put at risk by the toxic chemicals used on GMO test fields
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

St. Louis Police Department's Highest Ranking Female Officer was a Girl Scout!

Girl Scouts of America - June 16, 2014
Special Guest Blog by Charles Bolinger, Girl Scouts of Eastern MissouriMajor Rochelle Jones as a Girl Scout in St. Louis, MO. Before joining Girl Scouts, Major Jones said she was shy and quiet; now she is the highest ranking female officer in the St. Louis City Police Department!
St. Louis City Police Department’s highest ranking female officer, Major Rochelle Jones, kept a small detail from her boss until this May. 
Prior to serving as a guest speaker at Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri’s Project Anti-Violence Education (PAVE)rally in May, Major Jones told her boss, Police Chief Sam Dotson, that she used to be a Girl Scout.Major Rochelle Jones, St. Louis City Police Department
“Girl Scouts was my first leadership experience. How great it was - the teamwork, the positive experiences, and working with other girls and troop leaders,” she said.  
In 2007, Major Jones was promoted to command the homicide unit. She was the first woman and the first African American to serve in that role. Currently, she is the Night Chief: the top officer in the department during evening hours.
"I can sleep at night, knowing Major Jones is on duty, taking care of the city's police needs," said St. Louis Chief of Police Sam Dotson.
At May's PAVE rally, Major Jones advised the girl audience to stand up against bullying, and to call for an adult if needed. Major Jones also stressed the importance of volunteering and helping others.
"Once you make it or while you're making it, reach back to help others on their climb," she advised. 
Click here to learn how you can volunteer with Girl Scouts and help others on their climb!

Categories: Environment

Skyscraper-Size Ice Structures Discovered at Base of Greenland Ice Sheet

Yale Environment 360 - June 16, 2014
Melting and refreezing at the base of the Greenland ice sheet has created massive, complex structures the height of skyscrapers and the width of Manhattan, according to research published in Nature Geoscience.

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Massive structures below Greenland ice sheet. The hidden formations more than a mile below the surface stand in stark contrast to the nearly flat, smooth exterior of the ice sheet and may accelerate its flow toward the sea, researchers say. Scientists had previously interpreted the irregular topography at the base of the ice as hills or mountains, but ice-penetrating radar revealed that the structures were made of ice rather than rock. Scientists from Columbia University explained that as meltwater at the bottom refreezes over hundreds or thousands of years, it radiates heat into the surrounding ice sheet, making it pick up its pace as the ice becomes softer and flows more easily. Greenland's glaciers appear to be moving more rapidly toward the sea as climate warms, but it's unclear how the refreezing process will influence this trend, researchers said.
Categories: Environment, Health

Obama’s New Emission Rules: Will They Survive Challenges?

Yale Environment 360 - June 16, 2014
The sweeping nature of President Obama’s proposed regulations limiting carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants is likely to open his initiative to serious legal challenges. To date, however, the courts have given the federal government wide latitude in regulating CO2 under the Clean Air Act. BY MICHAEL B. GERRARD
Categories: Environment, Health
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