Environment

California Moves to Ban Plastic Mircobeads in Personal Care Products

The EnvironmentaList - May 26, 2014
Bill passed by state assembly sets a national precedent for holding companies liable for products that harm aquatic species
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Oil Drilling Permits Issued for Key Area of Yasuni Park

Yale Environment 360 - May 23, 2014
The Ecuadorean government has issued permits to begin oil drilling in a key area of the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve and National Park, one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. Environment Minister Lorena

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Yasuni Biosphere Reserve Tapia said the government had signed permits to begin preparations for drilling in the so-called ITT section of the park, which contains two uncontacted indigenous tribes; drilling itself could begin as early as 2016, the government said. Ecuador’s President, Rafeal Correa, had offered to ban drilling in large sections of the park if the international community raised $3.6 billion to compensate the country for leaving the oil in the ground. But after only $13 million was raised, Correa gave the green light to drilling, saying “the world has failed us.” Oil drilling has already taken place in some areas of the 6,500-square-mile park. As this Yale Environment 360 video shows, Yasuni is home to a remarkable array of species, including roughly 400 species of fish, 600 species of birds, and thousands of species of vascular plants and trees.
Categories: Environment, Health

The Decision to Wage Nuclear War Should Rest With the Body Politic, Argues Author

The EnvironmentaList - May 23, 2014
Book Review: Thermonuclear Monarchy: Choosing Between Democracy and Doom
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Oregon’s GMO Sellout

The EnvironmentaList - May 22, 2014
The backstory of the ALEC-modeled state law that overrides the ability of localities to regulate their own food systems
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Donors Commit $220 Million To Protect and Expand Huge Amazon Reserve

Yale Environment 360 - May 22, 2014
A coalition of private donors and government funders has pledged $220 million over the next 25 years to better protect the Amazon Region Protected Areas (ARPA), the world’s largest protected area network. WWF, the World Bank, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Inter-American Development Bank, and more than a dozen other donors are contributing funds to the initiative, which also will add another 8.9 million hectares of Amazon rainforest to the ARPA program, driving the total to more than 60 million hectares. That’s 232,000 square miles, an area larger than France. Most of the funds will be used to better police and enforce environmental laws on ARPA territory, which includes 90 parks and comprises 15 percent of the Brazilian Amazon. "The explosion in demand for natural resources has made our parks and world heritage sites vulnerable," said WWF president Carter Roberts. The initiative is also upgrading long-neglected parks and creating sustainable-use reserves for local communities and indigenous people.
Categories: Environment, Health

Putting San Francisco On the Road to Zero Waste

Yale Environment 360 - May 22, 2014
For two decades, Jack Macy has spearheaded San Francisco’s efforts to become a global leader in recycling. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, he talks about how San Francisco has engaged the public in a recycling crusade that has resulted in the city reusing or composting 80 percent of its garbage. BY CHERYL KATZ
Categories: Environment, Health

22 mayo - Día Internacional de la Diversidad Biológica

Costa Salvaje - May 22, 2014
22 mayo - Día Internacional de la Diversidad Biológica
Categories: Environment

Yakama Nation Fights for Nuclear Waste Cleanup at Hanford Site

The EnvironmentaList - May 21, 2014
Chinook salmon have returned in large numbers to the Columbia River, but tribal members worry about radioactive contamination
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

Trash-scooping Water Wheel Cleans up Garbage From Baltimore Harbor

Yale Environment 360 - May 20, 2014
A new contraption in a Baltimore river is helping to clear trash and debris — up to 50,000 pounds of it each day — from the city's Inner Harbor. The 50-foot-long

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Baltimore's trash-scooping water wheel "water wheel" gathers garbage floating in the Jones Falls River, which runs through the city to the Baltimore Inner Harbor, and deposits it in a large dumpster so the trash can be hauled away. Two large booms funnel debris toward a conveyor belt powered by the wheel, which itself is powered primarily by the flowing river. When the flow isn't strong enough to turn the wheel, water pumps, run by solar panels lining a canopy over the wheel, turn on and push water up to spin the wheel. The water wheel was designed to handle the heavy debris and larger pieces of trash that the river often carries, said its designer, Baltimore-based Clearwater Mills. It began operating earlier this month and cost $750,000, with $500,000 of that contributed by the Maryland Port Administration, Co.Exist reports.
Categories: Environment, Health

Widespread Greenland Melting Was Due to Forest Fires and Warming, Study Says

Yale Environment 360 - May 20, 2014
Rising temperatures and ash from Northern Hemisphere forest fires combined to cause large-scale surface melting of the Greenland ice sheet in 2012, an

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Extent of Greenland ice melt, July 8-12, 2012 echo of a similar event that occurred in 1889, a new study finds. The massive Greenland ice sheet — the second largest ice body in the world after the Antarctic ice sheet — experiences annual melting at low elevations near the coastline, but surface melt is rare in the dry snow region in its center. In July 2012, however, satellites observed for the first time surface melt across more than 97 percent of the ice sheet, generating reports that the event was almost exclusively the result of climate change. In the new report, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found that in both 2012 and 1889 exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires to darken the surface of the ice sheet to a critical albedo threshold, causing the large-scale melting events. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, large-scale melt events on the Greenland ice sheet may begin to occur almost annually by 2100, the researchers say.
Categories: Environment, Health

Girl Scout Camp: Then & Now

Girl Scouts of America - May 20, 2014
Girl Scouts has been nonpartisan and inclusive for 102 years. Even our very first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, GA, included girls of varying ethnicities, faiths, and economic backgrounds. This tradition is built into camp, a cornerstone Girl Scout experience.
While many camp and outdoor activities stick to tradition, Girl Scouts also provides more modern experiences and facilities, which many girls and their families are seeking.

From STEM camp and surf camp to Hogwarts camp, farming and sustainability camp, and Camp CEO, Girl Scouts is committed to pursuing its mission through innovative, fun, and memorable camp experiences.Take a look at...

Girl Scouts camp: then and now!



Then: 1970—Cheryl Williams, a unit leader in Tallahassee, FL, is surrounded by laughing campers. Source: NHPCNow: A camp counselor and campers delight in the sun at Girl Scouts of Western Washington’s Girl Scout Camp River Ranch, nestled at the foothills of the Cascade mountains approximately 45 minutes outside Seattle. Source.





Then: 1925—A troop leader reads to scouts in a semi-circle in the "Cave,” a meeting place with table and bench. Two other Troop Leaders sit in the group. Source: NHPC.Now: On a break from swimming in the camp pool and dominating the camp challenge courses, a troop leader reads to a troop from Girl Scouts of NE Kansas and NW Missouri’s Camp Prairie Schooner near Kansas City. Source









Then: 1940s (unspecified)— Seven scouts in a semi-circle roast marshmallow on sticks over a stone campfire. Source: NHPC.Now: Girl Scouts of Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois keep alive the marshmallow-roasting tradition with fun and friends! Source.










Then: 1959—Six Senior Girl Scouts camp out; one girl plays guitar while they all sing together. Source: NHPC.
Now: All smiles and fun, Girl Scouts learn to play guitar outside together at Girls and Guitar camp! Source.








Then: 1919—Girl Scouts perform a circle dance in a clearing. Source: NHPCNow: Girl Scouts of Wisconsin-Badgerland incorporate Healthy Habits into camp programming to ensure girl wellness. Here, Girl Scouts create a handstand circle—we’re pretty sure they’re laughing under water! Source.


Interested in finding a camp for your girl to flex her leadership muscle and have some fun? Find your local council and contact them regarding their innovative, fun, and memorable camp experiences!


Categories: Environment

Oregon’s Jackson County Votes Today on Whether to Ban Transgenic Crops

The EnvironmentaList - May 20, 2014
Measure 15-119 is the opening salvo of Oregonians' high-stakes campaign against Big Biotech
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

India's New Prime Minister Plans To Make A Major Push on Solar Energy Major Push on Solar Energy

Yale Environment 360 - May 19, 2014
India's new government plans to bring electricity to the homes of its entire population of 1.2 billion within the next five years, largely through solar panel installations, Narendra Modi Bloomberg News reports. Although nearly 400 million Indians do not have access to electricity, newly elected prime minister Narendra Modi, who won an overwhelming victory in last week's national vote, has pledged to enable every household to run at least one light bulb by 2019. If all goes well, household solar projects would allow every home to run two light bulbs, a solar cooker, and a television, one of Modi's energy advisers said. The plan follows an unfulfilled pledge from the previous administration to bring electricity to all homes by 2012. Modi, who pioneered India's first incentive program for large-scale solar projects when he was chief minister of Gujarat state, has made expanding solar a top priority because it has the potential to create jobs and supply power to millions of households, many of which are scattered throughout rural areas and not connected to the grid. "We look upon solar as having the potential to completely transform the way we look at the energy space," said the energy adviser.
Categories: Environment, Health

India's New President Plans To Make Major Push on Solar Energy

Yale Environment 360 - May 19, 2014
India's new government plans to bring electricity to the homes of its entire population of 1.2 billion within the next five years, largely through solar panel installations, Narendra Modi Bloomberg News reports. Although nearly 400 million Indians do not have access to electricity, newly elected president Narendra Modi, who won an overwhelming victory in last week's national vote, has pledged to enable every household to run at least one light bulb by 2019. If all goes well, household solar projects would allow every home to run two light bulbs, a solar cooker, and a television, one of Modi's energy advisers said. The plan follows an unfulfilled pledge from the previous administration to bring electricity to all homes by 2012. Modi, who pioneered India's first incentive program for large-scale solar projects when he was chief minister of Gujarat state, has made expanding solar a top priority because it has the potential to create jobs and supply power to millions of households, many of which are scattered throughout rural areas and not connected to the grid. "We look upon solar as having the potential to completely transform the way we look at the energy space," said the energy adviser.
Categories: Environment, Health

A Blueprint to End Paralysis Over Global Action on Climate

Yale Environment 360 - May 19, 2014
The international community should stop chasing the chimera of a binding treaty to limit CO2 emissions. Instead, it should pursue an approach that encourages countries to engage in a “race to the top” in low-carbon energy solutions. BY TIMOTHY E. WIRTH AND THOMAS A. DASCHLE
Categories: Environment, Health

Fher, vocalista de Maná, en defensa de Cabo Pulmo.

Costa Salvaje - May 19, 2014
Fher, vocalista de Maná, en defensa de Cabo Pulmo.
Categories: Environment

Rare Plants in Alberta Endangered by Tar Sands Extraction

The EnvironmentaList - May 18, 2014
Tar sands mining and transport threatens part of food web, but unlike animals, plants have few legal protections
Categories: Environment, News Feeds

U.S. Honeybee Death Rate Is Too High for Long-term Survival, Report Says

Yale Environment 360 - May 16, 2014
Honeybees in the United States are dying at a rate too high to ensure their long-term survival, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture

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U.S. honeybee deaths (USDA). Over the past winter — a season when honeybee hives are most vulnerable — the U.S. lost 23.2 percent of its hive honeybee population. That is lower than the previous winter's 30.5 percent death rate, but the cumulative impact on honeybee populations over the past eight years poses a major threat to their long-term survival, as well as the country's agricultural productivity, the USDA said. Roughly a quarter of U.S. crops depend on honeybees for pollination. "Yearly fluctuations in the rate of losses like these only demonstrate how complicated the whole issue of honey bee heath has become," said a USDA researcher, citing factors such as viruses, pathogens, and pesticides. One class of pesticides in particular, neonicotinoids, has been implicated in honeybee deaths. The European Union banned three widely used neonicotinoids last year, but they are still used in the U.S.
Categories: Environment, Health
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